Arnold Newman is acknowledged as one of the great masters of the 20th and 21st century photography and his work changed the art of the portrait, primarily through his development of the concept of the environmental portrait.


Newman, born in 1918, began experimenting with photography in 1938. In 1941 he was “discovered” and encouraged by both Alfred Steigltiz and Beaumont Newhall and began to photograph noted artists in their working and living environments. His one-man exhibition, Artists Look Like This, at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1945-46 launched his career, which continued unabated until his death sixty years later in 2006.


In a career of nearly seven decades, Newman produced iconic images of the artistic, intellectual and political figures of his day. He was equally at home with painters and Presidents, musicians or movie stars. His work, including his early non-portraiture and abstractions, has been widely exhibited in museums and galleries throughout his career, but was even more widely exhibited in the finest publications of the day. He produced twenty-four covers for LIFE magazine and many hundreds of photographs and photographic essays for Vanity Fair, Look, Harper’s Bazaar, Esquire, New York and many others.


Newman is one of the most honored of American photographers; he received virtually every national and international award and was bestowed with nine honorary doctorates. His personal philosophy was set for in the revealing photographic autobiography, One Mind’s Eye, and his continuing impact on the world of photography has been presented in numerous monographs and articles. His life’s work continues to stimulate all those who come in contact with it and his photographs of personalities of the past are perhaps our best link to them.



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